THE. JOURNAL

 

EMMANUEL DE BAYSER, TWO APARTMENTS ONE CONCISE COLLECTION

 

EMMANUEL DE BAYSER: TWO APARTMENTS, ONE CONCISE COLLECTION

| BERLIN & PARIS |

IMAGE SOURCE | THE SOCIALITE FAMILY, TRENDLANDATELIER DORE, VOGUE AUSTRALIA

QUOTE SOURCE | VOGUE AUSTRALIA, THE SOCIALITE FAMILY, ALAIN DE BOTTON

WORDS | KARA TOWN



From his primary residence in a late 19th century building in Berlin, to his Paris pied-à-terre, it is clear that The Corner Berlin co-owner Emmanuel de Bayser is dedicated to collecting design heavyweights like: Georges Jouve, Pierre Jeanneret, Jean Prouvé and Charlotte Perriand. As legend has it, when de Bayser ran out of room for his furniture collection, that's when he turned his attention to collecting the sought-after work of 20th century ceramicist, Georges Jouve; and, it's an impressive collection at that. Serge Mouille lighting also features in both residence alongside various works of contemporary and African art. There are also significant cameos by: Paul Frankl, François-Xavier Lalanne, India Mahdavi, Denise Gatard and Ron Arad.

When speaking about his Parisian pied-à-terre de Bayser is quick to point out the differences between the two:

“Here, I wanted to emphasise that ‘Parisian-chic’ feeling with the Napoleon III style of the bedroom and that grand view over Parc Monceau,” he explains. “It gives you the feeling of actually living in the French countryside, with all the trees and the birds singing in the morning. Berlin, on the other hand, feels more like a snug bolthole, more intimate, because of its location in the central-city Mitte district. But both have the signature of Emmanuel de Bayser and of The Corner Berlin interior projects.”

Differences aside, great praise must be given to de Bayser for his repetitious use of certain furniture, ceramic and art pieces within each residence - in my mind, it's consistencies such as this that add to the overall meditative, moderate feel of both spaces. All cleverly offset by a natural palette accented with moments of considered colour, as well as a clear consideration for material:

"I like the contrast of materials, for example the encounter between hot and cold (metal/wood) or hard and comfortable (wood/fabric). Same colour levels, with black and white together or a combination of primary shades."

There are many things we can all learn from these two impeccably edited interiors of de Bayser by de Bayser. But, perhaps the main takeaway is to never underestimate the meditative capabilities of an interior- the internal flow. It is this precise point, where the visual and the sensory successfully combine to celebrate the communicative power of personal collections, where we are able to draw vitality, integrity and balance from our space. It is these 'emotional textures' that ultimately ensure we achieve harmony in, and maintain a connection with, our homes and ourselves.