THE. JOURNAL

 

JOAN MIRO, IN THE WORDS OF HIS GRANDSON

Joan Miró, IN THE WORDS OF HIS GRANDSON

QUOTE SOURCE | THE WORLD OF INTERIORS, OCTOBER 2015

ORIGINAL WORDS | Joan Punyet Miró FROM ‘El Ojo de Miró’

IMAGE SOURCE | THE RED LIST

ADDITIONAL WORDS | KARA TOWN


In 1959 artist Joan Miró bought an eighteenth century rural Mallorcan house. What ensued, was a ‘folkloric’ fascination with the object. Miró’s grandson, Joan Punyet Miró, wrote about this in ‘El Ojo de Miró’ (with an excerpt from the book published in THE WORLD OF INTERIORS, OCTOBER 2015). As Miró’s grandson tells it, this Mallorcan home was one of the great influencers of Miró’s life and practice.

‘Miró became bewitched by the interior. The thickness of the walls, their history, the ancient materials used in their construction and the manual process that created their texture made of Son Boter a sort of cave where the druid could prepare his secret formulas and perform his rituals…The telluric realm beneath the earth can be felt there. The cracks, the irregular walls and twisted ceilings generate a special aura like that of a monastery.

Miró modified nothing. For him, that would have erased its life force. He just emptied the house and began to bring all sorts of bizarre found objects, together with everything he needed for his work…”

As these found objects began to dominate the space, they eventually gave way to Miró’s famed assemblage sculptures. Known for his ability to cross over between ‘revolutionary perspectives’ Miró had developed an innate vision largely informed by the company he kept, and his commitment to a peasant-like state; he became a scavenger of sorts.

“Graffiti, based on the found objects he collected, would later morph into assemblage sculptures. Miró began to draw directly onto the walls in the early 1960s; this helped him to imagine the sculptures in real size, as totemic elements that would empower his imagination. In a sense, you could say he used the whole building as a sort of sketchbook.

Miró was keen on finding an order where every object would have the space to breathe and establish a dialogue with its surroundings. As he often said, he was unable to work without having created a particular intrinsic ambience. And it’s true that as soon as you cross the threshold of Son Boter, you are imbued by Miró’s spirit. It is like entering his subconscious and decoding his spiritual DNA.”


(L) Joan Miró by Claude Gaspar, 1967

(R) Joan Miró assembling objects of Women and Child sculpture sitting 1967. Photo by Claude Gaspari

ART, ARTIST, OBJECTKara Town